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About the exhibition

Den Samiske Halvtimen (The Sami half-hour) deals with different definitions and perspectives on saminess. The work reflects on the artist's Sea sami roots, in the context of an international wave of indigenous peoples taking back their identity and defining power over their own culture. Salo will show that the Sami culture is not static, but modern and moving forward, with a circular connection to earth, nature, and people. She wants to show a different picture of the Sami than the existing postcard pictures that people usually associate with the culture.

Installation: The hanging work, the fabrics in wool and nylon, are inspired by a field work in Varanger, the eastern northern areas of Norway. The pattern is hand-drawn, and the fabrics are knitted on a high-tech shima seiki digital knitting machine. Inspired by woodcuts, she has used the machine to create two patterns, which she later varies with different yarn qualities and colors.
She has used the technology to create something unique as well. By making mistakes in knitting machine she has got three deconstructed works as well. The work is hung in a circle, to reflect on the circular understanding of Sami culture, and indigenous culture in general.

Goahti: A goahti (Northern Sámi) is a sami hut or tent ree types of covering: fabric, peat moss or timber. This cottage is common in the Seaside Sami areas Salo grew up, and has served as a summer home for reindeer herding. It was also used as a focal point for storytelling in the artist's upbringing. It shows another perspective on Sami architecture, which is not as well-known as the lavvu.

This cottage is common in the Seaside Sami areas Salo grew up, and has served as a summer home for reindeer herding. It was also used as a focal point for storytelling in the artist's upbringing. It shows another perspective on Sami architecture, which is not as well-known as the lavvu.
This hut is made of many different fabrics, the knitted but also handwoven on a small loom. Time-consuming work that also reflects on Sami understanding of time. You can find buttons on the goathi. These are handmade from reindeer antlers, and it is the bone marrow that creates the unique patterns on the button. There are also various lace fabrics. The Sami have always been influenced by trade with the East, and Sami clothing often consists of wool, but also fabrics made in Taiwan. Goathi reflects on the Sami way of life, before and now.

Fotograf Istvan Virag / Akershus Kunstsenter